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 Obese men who delay bariatric surgery face major health risks

fat; belly; overweight; obesity; man; weight; male; diet; pants;
Updated: December 5, 2020
Posted In: Best Of The Web

A recent study conducted by researchers at the University of California at Davis has found that women are four times as likely to have bariatric surgery than men.

Women who have a body mass index (BMI) that falls into the obesity range tend to better understand the risks and health complications of being obese compared to men with the same BMI. For reasons that remain uncertain at this time, most men delay undergoing bariatric surgery until they have started to suffer from health complications related to their condition.

The study involved nearly 1,400 patients who were being considered and evaluated for bariatric surgery — 82 percent of which were women. All patients involved in the bariatric study were suffering from health complications related to being obese, which are also known as comorbidities, such as obstructive sleep apnea, joint pain, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and more. Most bariatric clinics in the United States generally consider patients eligible for bariatric surgery if they are obese and suffer from one or more comorbidities.

Upon evaluating all the weight-loss patients, the researchers found that on average, all men involved in the study suffered from more comorbidities than women and had higher BMIs, which put them at even higher risk for major health complications.

The study, which was published in Surgical Endoscopy, concluded that men classified as obese can drastically lower their risk for major health complications if they decide to undergo bariatric surgery before their conditions worsen. When left untreated, obesity can increase the risk for cardiovascular disease, cancer, and death.

If you are interested in weight loss surgery, check out MBL’s Ultimate Guide To Weight Loss surgery.

 

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